Posts tagged: csharp

Export Dynamic LINQ to CSV

By , September 8, 2019 3:22 am

LINQ allows to perform various queries against different data structures. Wouldn’t it be great if you could easily export result of a LINQ query to CSV? Fortunately you can! This article by Scott Hanselman explain how and culminates in cool in its simplicity code:

namespace FooFoo
{
    public static class LinqToCSV
    {
        public static string ToCsv<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items)
            where T : class
        {
            var csvBuilder = new StringBuilder();
            var properties = typeof(T).GetProperties();
            foreach (T item in items)
            {
                string line = string.Join(",",properties.Select(p => p.GetValue(item, null).ToCsvValue()).ToArray());
                csvBuilder.AppendLine(line);
            }
            return csvBuilder.ToString();
        }
 
        private static string ToCsvValue<T>(this T item)
        {
            if(item == null) return "\"\"";
 
            if (item is string)
            {
                return string.Format("\"{0}\"", item.ToString().Replace("\"", "\\\""));
            }
            double dummy;
            if (double.TryParse(item.ToString(), out dummy))
            {
                return string.Format("{0}", item);
            }
            return string.Format("\"{0}\"", item);
        }
    }
}

This code adds .ToCsv() extension method to any IEnumerable so you can run something like

string csv = linqQuery.ToCSV()

Unfortunately this doesn’t work if your query is Dynamic LINQ query Continue reading 'Export Dynamic LINQ to CSV'»

Dynamic LINQ to XML

By , September 8, 2019 1:59 am

Language Integrated Query (LINQ) is a cool feature of .NET languages like C# that allows you to perform SQL-like query right within the language against language’s data structures (lists, arrays etc.) But one drawback of LINQ – you have to know in advance, at compile time which fields to select, what filter conditions would be. Sometimes there’s a need to supply these at runtime – e.g. user selects which fields they want to see

Thankfully there exists Dynamic LINQ Library that allows you to supply LINQ parameters as a string akin Dynamic SQL. Here’s an example of such query from the library’s homepage:

var query = db.Customers
    .Where("City == @0 and Orders.Count >= @1", "London", 10)
    .OrderBy("CompanyName")
    .Select("new(CompanyName as Name, Phone)");

Now, one thing that LINQ can do is query XML. So in theory if we load, say, this XML:

<DATA_CENTER>
   <SERVER IP="1.2.3.4">
      <OS>Windows</OS>
   </SERVER>
   <SERVER IP="5.6.7.8">
      <OS>Linux</OS>
   </SERVER>
</DATA_CENTER>

into an XElement and run something like this

var query0 = myXElement.Elements()
          .AsQueryable()
          .Select("new (Attribute(\"IP\").Value as IP, Element(\"OS\").Value as OS)")

it would produce list of IPs and OSes. Unfortunately this doesn’t work. Continue reading 'Dynamic LINQ to XML'»

Pushing pins to Pebble Time timeline from .NET code

By , May 12, 2015 1:27 pm

Timeline on Pebble Time Pebble Time timeline is a very cool user interface allowing you to see future and past events and act upon them right on your watch. Right out of the box Pebble Time supports calendar pins that shows your future and past appointments in the timeline as well as weather alerts. But the real power comes from 3rd party apps using timeline – they can add anything from sports scores to latest news to TV showtimes – limit is just your imagination.
Pebble has always had open SDK – this is one of its major strengths, and Timeline is not an exception. Timeline API is a very straightforward way to push your own pins to users of your app. There’re various examples and libraries including PHP and node.js on how to deal with the timeline, but I, being mostly a Microsoft developer by trade, decided to bring Timeline into .NET. This particular example is in ASP.NET – pin is pushed from Webpage when user clicks a button, but it’s just one of the possible scenarios.

In order to push timeline pins successfully you will need 2 pieces:

  1. A watchapp that runs on Pebble. In fact after first run, that subscribes user to timeline, the app doesn’t have to be running on the watch anymore. It doesn’t even have to be on the watch. As long as it simple remains in your locker on the phone – you will continue to receive its pins
  2. Your own server that sends calls to Pebble public Timeline API to control pins

Continue reading 'Pushing pins to Pebble Time timeline from .NET code'»

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